All posts filed under: Home Canning

Fine as Frog Hair

There are a couple of inherent truths when it comes to the South. 1.   If I can make my livestock do something funny, I’ll show it to you. If I can make you pay to see it, even better Actually, at Goats on the Roof in Tiger, Georgia – it’s free to look at the goats living and traversing the network of ladders and bridges  overhead between the buildings. There are, however, several nifty country store shops and a deli in which to free you of your cash. And, I can’t tell you the number of instrument playing chickens and ducks I’ve seen at the various county fairs and festivals across the mountains. 2.  If it fits between 2 slices of bread, it’s a sandwich.   We all know of  ‘mater sammiches and that girth inducing delicacy of bananas and peanut butter championed by “The King”, but I have been privvy of a whole host of side dishes and condiments slapped between 2 slices of white bread and slathered with mayo. I eaten many a pineapple sandwich, green …

Say ‘ello to my Leetle Friend

He goes by many names – Japanese Hardy Orange, Chinese Bitter Orange, Poncirus Trifoliata, Trifolate Orange, Gou Ju.. But I just call him Flying Dragon. Poncirus Trifolate, oddly, isn’t actually a citrus plant even though it produces a type of citrus fruit. It is closer related to a Limeberry or Sapote tree. Being extremely cold hardy, citrus growers will often graft onto the root stock to increase the hardiness of their intended crop. The actual fruit of the flying dragon… well, it’s a labor of love. Characterized by deciduous leaves, severely contorted branches, and wicked, wicked, evil 1.5″ to 2″ spikes emerging alternately with the branches. The flying dragon gained wide popularity in the early part of the 20th century when it was introduced from Japan as a specimen tree. It has since made it’s way onto several noxious plant listings and considered a hazzard in pastured areas due mainly to the profusion of seeds in a single fruit and the danger the ridiculously sharp thorns are to livestock. And then… there’s the whole  edible / not edible thing…. …