All posts filed under: One Pot Meals

Under Pressure – Braised Back Ribs

This was actually the first thing we did in the micro cooker. Seeing that I really didn’t want to waste a lot of money on something just in case the end product was a hot steaming mess. I’ve opted to take the basic timing and procedures for the Lamb Shank recipe in the provided cookbookerlette and apply that thought process to something about the same quality and texture – Beef Back Ribs. This recipe consists of 1 pound of badly cut beef back ribs – 8 Pieces of Rib – $3.95 total…(on sale at the market today) Considering that to get back ribs.. or shanks… or shoe leather edible should take between 2.5 to 3 hours in a conventional oven… or up to 8 hours in a slow cooker, I’m calling this a win. The ribs are very tender, although some of the rib connective membrane hasn’t softened up as much as I like. And to be totally honest, that probably would have corrected itself if I had removed the chine off the backside of the riblettes. …

Kitchen Fodder – Meatballs Under Pressure

Curry No, I’m not talking about the little red & white can that sits in the pantry growing dust bunnies because you only pull it out once every 6 years to make those curried glazed carrots you’ve read so much about. No. That stuff is for Cretans and Malcontents.  Anywhere else in the world, curry is a dance – a give and take of spices and aromatics – that when blended properly, transforms a dish to such exotic heights, it is the culinary equivalent of Mount Everest…. (sought by many, obtained only by the very adventurous). So… Seeing the Curried Lamb Meatball recipe the the little CooksEssentials Microwave Pressure Cookery Bookerlette… I was intrigued… but very, very cautious. Like most things, I monkeyed around with their recipe. Not because I’m just a bad person, but like finding that curry nirvana, I have my own particular likes and dislikes that play into the picture when creating that perfect spice blend. Granted, if you’re not terribly particular, you could just open up that red/white container and hawk in 2 big spoonfuls …

Dumplings with Jane

Clara, my great grandmother, always kept chickens.  And while the majority of the time chickens were for eggs, old layers, non-layers and overly mean roosters made their way into the stewing pot for one of Clara’s specialties – Chicken & Dumplings. Now, a lot of people make dumplings a lot of different ways; there are those thick, dense almost noodle -like dumplings; there are the globs of biscuit dough plopped on top of the broth; then there is Clara’s way – soft, tender, pillow-y dumplings, barely holding together amongst the rich broth and bits of dark meat. Jane tells a story of a time just after she married my dad. She had been on the Square in Marietta, doing some bit of shopping, and stopped in at Clara’s just about lunch time. Clara had just made a big pot of dumplings and served her up a bowl. Those same soft dumplings, that rich, flavorful broth – Jane kept commenting on how good those dumplings were.. “The best Chicken and Dumplings I’ve ever had”, she told her. My …

Soup & The Blustery Day

Monday Morning… They said we could be expecting some rain. They said it would be fast-moving, with periods of heavy precipitation. I checked the weather just before bed and things had been upgraded to Rain Apocalypse… or at least, going by the way the weather people were talking about it.  I poo-pooed it all and crawled into bed. Tuesday 4 AM… I woke with a start to a fantastic lightening storm and this…   … on the news. they still said it would fast-moving and everything should be all clear by mid morning. It was’t. It sheeted rain all day.   It poured by the buckets.   It looked like dense, heavy fog… but you know… with rain.  It ran down the hillside in a deluge; gathering bits of forest trash… limbs… small animals – creating waterfalls where they normally don’t exist. My trusty rain gauge worked overtime… I emptied it 3 times during the constant downpour. Around 7 O’Clock PM, the rain abated and left us with a sterilized forest floor and the Fall leaves …

Baleful Bounty ~ Sauce Rustica

With Summer in full swing, the garden should be producing to beat the drum. However, after the issues I had earlier in the season, I’ve played it safe on the tomatoes; I only planted one plant of a single variety ( Mountain Pride). And, since it’s a late season tomato… there isn’t anything resembling a ripe fruit on the vines yet.  Thankfully, friends are seeing to it that I have more than enough extra ripe tomatoes to go around. Here’s the thing with being gifted with a dozen tomatoes that are ready to eat NOW – like it or not, some are going to go bad. And the only way to combat all that spoilage is to either cook it down to sauce, or can them (which I don’t do), or zipper bag them up whole – and freeze them (as it happens, I’m all over that action.) Freezing and thawing fully ripe tomatoes allow you to keep that fresh picked flavor that you don’t get with a processed product. Granted, they can’t be used for …

Taste of Summer ~ Saffron Steamed Mussels

There are memories of sea things that will always remind me what a magical time & place summer is at the ocean… Being pulled away from Lost in Space on the TV and braving the torrential rain at the Desoto Beach Hotel restaurant to dine on Mrs. Paul’s Fish Sticks; Chowing down with the family after getting suitably roasted on the beach at Captain Anderson’s in Panama City as a kid (complete with my very own captain’s hat); Sweltering night at open pit Oyster roasts on the banks of Wilmington Island;  gorging myself on steamed clams under the Thunderbolt bridge at Desposito’s; buying (and single-handedly devouring) an entire brown paper grocery sack of seasoned blue crabs from Keith’s (or “Keet’s”.. as the locals pronounced it) Crab Shack in the somewhat shady area of Savannah…. and any one of the 200 times that I had a big pot of steamed mussels with a cold brew, plucking them out of the shells and watching the sun ripple and drift slowly below the horizon. Summer… Sand… Seafood – …

A “Dusting” of Snow… and some soup

We had been jonzing for some snow up here at Turtle Creek all winter. There’d be predictions and rumors; hints and allegations; threats and speculations; and then nothing. You would think that living in the great northern Georgia woods we’d see flakes on a fairly regular basis. But, where we’re located, the terrain and currents push the bulk of the wintry mix far to the west and north of us… when it happens at all. So, I didn’t put a whole lot of stock in this week’s prediction that we would enjoy a 1/4″ of blissful late afternoon precipitation, since the bulk of the storm was going to be far south of us. Even as the snow did begin to fall at 9 am, it was anemic. Small pinhead sized flakes that looked more like kosher salt than snow. Jane and I glanced out the windows occasionally enjoying the mist-like snowfall, and in our minds thinking that’s nice… but it wont last long. By two o’clock, we had just over 2″ of the tiny flakes on …

Simple Dinner Sunday ~ Chicken & Rice

Bonus at the market the other day…. tiny chickens. I’m not talking game hens (which can run upwards of $8), I’m talking itty bitty one pound fryers…. for a buck. I grabbed a handful (six) tossed them  in the cart, and sang a little song all the way to checkout. ♫ ♬ Tiny chickens … in the bin… makes me feel happy… when I win…♫ ♬ (Dean Martin’s Tiny Bubbles… you can sing along if you want.) I ended up spatchcocking a couple and grilling them, which worked out exceptionally well since they were very young chickens and extremely tender. But Jane’s been… well … punky… the past few days, so I planned on making some healing chicken soup with a few of them. But with the cooler weather and all, I wanted something more Stick-To-Your-Rib (ish) … and I compromised. Chicken & Rice Since I’m dealing with an anemic chicken – I’ve bolstered the meat by adding in a cup of boneless thigh meat and the leftover bones from the spatchcocking. I’m basing the recipe as if …

Curb Market Crawl – Persnickety Parsnips

I popped in to one the numerous curb farm markets the other day on a mission. My dwarf long pod okra plants are disappointing – as in puny, sickly little plants – and in my head I figured farm market = farmer. I mean, I can grow okra. And over the past four years I’ve become fairly adept at growing well producing, Jack and the Beanstalk tall okra plants…. so I know a thing or two. But these dwarf plants… there’s just no love there. They are barely 8″ tall, and at the rate we’re going, it’ll be October before I see pod one. I wanted some help. Turns out, Farm Market  = Green Grocer and he wasn’t all that much help in that arena except to suggest that maybe I should pull up the dwarfs and  lay in some Clemson Spineless Okra plants (which he happened to have a large shelf full of right by the register). Not a whole lot of help – but I did grudgingly pick up a couple of pots …

Cookbook Sunday, and a little tail

I have no illusions that this post will resonate with a vast majority of readers. Just as well as I know that 80% of you probably wouldn’t  make this dish even as a last resort. These revelations come to me due in a very large part to the fact that I picked up 6 (that’s six) 2 pound packages of Ox Tail ( at an amazing $2.95 a package) from the market this week because they were in the burn-out bin – meaning… no one wanted to buy them. In a way, I get it. It isn’t a particularly attractive cut of meat. It can be an extremely tough cut to do something with, it’s mostly bone, and you can’t throw it on a grill. It takes time, effort and more that a squoosh of love to coax the delectable flavors out of the oxen’s swishing business end. But invest the time and effort and you have something truly worth eating. This week’s cookbook of choice is (drum-roll, please) Beef and Veal from the The Good Cook Series Time / Life Books, …