All posts tagged: Grilling

Wine Country Chicken

With Memorial Weekend fully upon us. it’s time to pull off that expensive grill cover, check your fire supplies, and give it a good ol’ cleaning… because you know you’re going to be spending a lot of time out there flipping burgers, rolling dogs, and gettin’ experimental. To be perfectly honest – I’ve never cooked “Beer Can Chicken“. Shoving a shiny can of Pabst up the southern-most end of a bird and grilling the bejeezus out of it, just doesn’t appeal to me. I’m dubious that it adds any real moisture, and even more doubtful that an unadulterated warm beer enema is suitable flavoring for…well, anything.   That being said… I watch a lot of PBS cooking shows. You always learn something new and you don’t have to contend with a lot of flappy patter from personalities trying to be …well, charming…. they just cook. I catch episodes of Steven Raichlen’s Primal Grill periodically. I find it to be one of the best grill-specific instructionals out there. I say instructional, because he is kinda hard to listen to. Stilted, monotone …

Steakhouse ~ Red Spring Onions

  Looking at this year’s garden plan, I realized I had gotten a tad over-zealous with my onion planting. No one really needs 5 dozen red onion plants… especially when I’ve got 3 dozen Texas Sweet and another 4 dozen Late Season Yellows bedded in. I mean, I do like me some onions, but I’d never be able to utilize all the reds before they rotted… or stunk up the pantry… or both. So I’ve harvested them all as tender spring onions. Why, you ask? Because: 1). As a spring onion, they hold less water than the common white variety, which makes them a bit more meaty. 2). Less Water means they’ll hold up better on the grill and not disintegrate into a slimy pile. 3). They are less aggressive than white onions, and can be added to salads without the fear of onions taking the salad bowl hostage. 4). Red onions (even the immature ones) have up to 8 times the anti-oxidants as their paler cousins, making them an excellent choice for healthier eating. …

Merry Christmas – it’s a pig…

So, I can always count on my brother to put a lot of thought and effort into any gift he slings my way. He read my mind (or maybe just saw the slightly more than slick shoes on the truck) and got new tires for the beast. One year it was a big slammin‘ box of assorted cheese from Artisanal Cheese Company. My fishing gear became badly depleted, and some fishing tackle arrived. Christmas, This past year my gift was a piece of paper that said – “It’s downstairs…  in the freezer.” It was a pig. It was a nude, scrubbed, bubble wrapped, pink, 14 lb. piglet… with bright blue eyes. I’ll give you a minute to let that sink in…. pig. I was stoked! No, really.. I was. I’ve always wanted to do a pig roast. But the thought of : 1. Buying an 80 lb. pig 2. Brining and Seasoning the beast 3. Trying to wallow the greased carcass into a pit 4. Figuring out what to do with that much cooked pig… …

Steakhouse

So… when I was a kid, our choices for steak night out were limited to: 1). A place called Harvey’s that had their menus printed on happy steer-shaped paper place-mats or 2). A place called Buddy’s, a noisy place complete with red shiynl banquettes, wood paneling, and air permeated with the thick aromas of steak fat, french dressing and cigarettes (it was the 60’s.) … we ate at Buddy’s more times than not. And although all that up there  now sounds really terrible, it was something really special back then. Even now I can close my eyes and be in the restaurant. All those smells, aromas, and memories of the six of us packed into a corner booth – eating our iceberg salad with the crackers, tomato wedges and onion rings awash in dressing – waiting on our steaks to arrive in those sizzle plates, the juices pooling into those odd tree-shaped valleys in the center of the platter  come flooding back. Besides, I have to give it to them, they really did make a good steak. I …

Weight of the World on my Lamb Shoulder…

Steaks… There’s a bit of contention when it comes to lamb shoulder steaks. There are those who believe that you should only braise them because the connective tissue – bone – and general condition of the musculature make them an unlikely candidate for anything short of 3 hours in a stew. … And then there are people like me that spit in the fan of naysayers, and fire up the grill every time. You can usually find shoulder (or Blade ) steaks in the fast sell section at the butcher shop. The double bone and (in my area) the fact that it’s lamb makes them somewhat undesirable… meaning – you can usually pick up a one pound 1″ thick steak for somewhere around $5.50 – which is a pretty good deal, considering it’s, you know… lamb, and beats the bejeezus out of $19.95 a pound for chops. If you can’t seem to find shoulder steaks at your market, pick up a good meaty shoulder roast and have your butcher cut it into decent 1″ chops for you. (most …

Copper River Salmon – Poked and Prodded, The Big Thaw, Part 2

You remember last week when I grilled that Tequila and Lemongrass Salmon? well…. Tequila & Lemongrass Salmon That was only part of the story. There was supposed to be  crispy salmon tacos, ancho roasted salmon and salmon skewers to go along with it for just this glutton-fest of frozen salmon. Only, I spent the morning cleaning two bedrooms, a bathroom, did a little gardening, took a nap, spent an hour in a fog because I took an afternoon nap, mopped the house, made the tequila glaze, and took another nap (leave me alone, I’ve been suffering with a sinus infection)… and then, I was beat… and tired… and didn’t want to do anything except grill a big ole’ piece of salmon. Which left me either lying to you about the other stuff… or going out and buying more salmon to do the other stuff. I got around to it yesterday. Crispy Salmon Tacos When Copper River sent us this last box o’ joy, they suggested we make tacos with it. Honestly? I wasn’t all that …

Copper River Salmon – The Big Thaw

A couple of weeks ago, as part of the Fresh Catch Crew, the super folks at Copper River sent me a new box o’ salmon. It was a frozen whole frozen side of  sockeye salmon from the Prince William Sound. Prince William Sound A Sound is a large body of the ocean located between two bodies of land. The Prince William Sound is located on the Southern coast of Alaska – bordered by the Kenai Pennisula on the west, and the Montague and Hinchinbrook  Barrier Islands to the south offering protection from the rugged Gulf of Alaska. This optimum location provides isolated, pristine, glacial pure water into the gulf that supports a healthy, sustainable salmon run. I’ve already extolled the beauty and glory of sockeye salmon… many times – so I’ll dispense with that this time… a little. But – like I said – what I got this time was a frozen side. Here’s the thing with frozen fish. Given the choice (and available cash), I’ll buy fresh fish. Not that there’s anything wrong with frozen – I just prefer it that …

Simple Dinner Sunday – All up in your grill…

It’s the Memorial Weekend and I’d be remiss if I didn’t have a grillin’ thang or two to add to the backyard hoo haa. And since I’m not going to be doing the cooking tomorrow.. you get it today. And, since I kinda lean that way anyway, it’s a couple of stupid simple dishes from the Asian inspired side of the road: Sweet Chili Pork Blades and a Quick Griddle Kale Stir Fry Okay, I say simple – and I mean it. So that means I’m pulling together a couple of bottled and canned things to speed up the process. 1st, you’re going to need a bottle of this: Thai Sweet Chili Sauce Yes, I can make it myself.. and you probably can too – but why bother. You aren’t going to make it as good as what comes bottled up for your enjoyment, and remember.. we’re doing things quick today. Do make sure you find the sauce with the shredded carrots and turnip in it… if you can. (Hint… this one has it.) Right then, …

All That Lemony Goodness – Numero Otto (that’s 8)

Tuscan Lemon Chicken and Cookbook Sundays This post is part of Couscous and Consciousness’s Cookbook Sundays Project. What you say? Pf cooking from a cookbook? Unadorned? Well, it’s true. I know I don’t normally play the “cook someone else’s food” game. I don’t usually play well with others… I’m the run with scissors kind of guy. Cookbooks to me are an inspiration… or food porn… or just a good giggle, sometimes. I’ll read them through, and start making changes straight away. but.. with something over 3,000 cookbooks in the shelves (and some I’ve never even opened), I thought.. why the hell not. Some of these should start getting some use before the pages all stick together… The Tuscan Lemon Chicken recipe is from the Barefoot Contessa’s Back to Basics cookbook. I haven’t monkeyed around with it – honestly there isn’t any need. It’s lemony (and you know I adore lemon), and the right amount of herbiness, and its stupid simple to boot. So this even fits in our Simple Dinner Sunday category. I have added a …

One From Column A – Char Siu

Brian (my partner in crime for a great many years) and I lived for Saturdays. Saturday was the day the BBQ Place (I know, a strange name for a Chinese restaurant) at Asian Square on Buford Hwy pumped out non stop Char Siu – and we stuffed ourselves in plate upon plate of  mahogany lacquered, perfectly seasoned medallions. Char Siu – or Chinese BBQ Pork used to be a staple at every Chinese restaurant. You could order it fresh off the rotary thingy, sliced and served with a heap of rice; find it diced and scattered like little jewels throughout the pork fried rice; used in twice cooked pork, and minced – mixed with hoisin sauce and stuffed in bbq buns. Times were it was a staple at every Mr. Won’s, House of Eng, Mama Wu, Ho Ho, Cantonese Palace (insert your favorite Chinese Restaurant here). But those are sad days gone by. Like a great many things in equally diverse cultures, time – money – labor have taken their toll, and unless your particular Chinese haunt does their own slowly turning, crisperizing Peking Duck, …